For lack of deconfinement of the museum, an exhibition of the painter William Turner becomes virtual

For lack of deconfinement of the museum, an exhibition of the painter William Turner becomes virtual post thumbnail image

For lack of deconfinement of the museum, an exhibition of the painter William Turner becomes virtual

Stroll through the alleys of the Jacquemard-André Museum, discovering the works of the greatest English watercolourist of the 19th century without leaving your home.

William Turner, the greatest English watercolorist of the 19th century and absolute master of light and color, is no longer on display. Organized with the Tate Britain in London, the Turner exhibition at the Musée Jacquemard-André in Paris, which is now confined to the museum, can be viewed free of charge online. During a virtual visit, you can discover sixty watercolors and ten paintings, some of which have never been shown in France. Intimate and sometimes almost experimental works.

Virtual and immersive walk

It’s a one-hour walk from room to room, as if you were there. Use your mouse to find your way around the museum’s galleries. Feel free to zoom in on the paintings, and for each one, listen to a commentary by the curator if you wish. Discreet footsteps of visitors have even been added, to make the virtual tour even more immersive.

There are two artists in Turner: the gifted and classical student, who became director of the Royal Academy, and the itinerant painter who one day entered Italy in the dazzling light and the sun. In front of his whirlpools of colours, more and more evanescent, one wonders how Turner managed to make this palpitation of light.”It’s a bit of a mystery,” says Pierre Curie, co-curator of the exhibition, “He seems to have had a prodigious visual memory. He just made little pencil sketches on the spot, and six months later in the studio, he managed to completely recreate the light that seems so real, so strong, so natural.”

The evolution of the artist’s style, notes the co-curator, is particularly noticeable in some of the canvases: “At first there are views of a very classical, extremely picturesque castle, then views of another, almost immaterial castle, where it seems as if Turner tried to paint the air and the pulverulent light around the castle… But not the castle.”

The painter’s last works are very close to what will become abstraction, taking him even further away from his false reputation as a first impressionist.Turner left nearly 20,000 watercolours, many of which are still unknown.

Like other establishments, the Jacquemard-André Museum is aiming to reopen on June 2, while in the meantime, “Turner, paintings and watercolours, Tate collection” can be visited on the internet.

https://www.eden-gallery.com/paintings-collection/

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